vogue-pussyxo:

God bless him.
vogue-pussyxo:

God bless him.
vogue-pussyxo:

God bless him.
vogue-pussyxo:

God bless him.
vogue-pussyxo:

God bless him.

dianaspot:

image of Princess Diana on a yacht in Portofino, Italy, in August 1997.

(via catwalkcats)

“When I turned vegan, I didn’t feel that way about every animal around. I’ve noticed it’s something that changes naturally. Nowadays I vacuum around a spider, catch flies to release them outside and let silverfish go about their business; a whole new world, a whole new-found mental peace. I love being vegan, it’s the best thing that ever happened to me. I finally understand, we all have but one life, human, cow, ant, everyone, it is not our right to take it away in a whim, simply because we can, it’s their right to live their lives, just like us, just like me.”
— Jaco van Drongelen (Nov 29, 2013)

(via lustyyouth)

otakugangsta:

src
“Life becomes more meaningful when you realize the simple fact that you’ll never get the same moment twice.”

maliara:

ABJ Glassworks Large Teardrop Terrarium on MILLE

(via coffeestainedcashmere)

rookiemag:

newsweek:

Since its inception in 1936, the Fields Medal has been awarded to 52 of the most exceptional mathematicians in the world under the age of 40. For the first time, that award has gone to a woman: Maryam Mirzakhani, 37, an Iranian-born mathematician who works at Stanford.

She shared the prize — the highest honor in mathematics — with Martin Hairer, 38, of the University of Warwick, England; Manjul Bhargava, 40, of Princeton; and Arthur Avila, 35, of the National Center for Scientific Research, France.

According to The New York Times, 70% of doctoral degrees in math are awarded to males, making the award to Mirzakhani especially noteworthy. In the related field of physics, only two women have ever won the Nobel Prize. Only one has won in economics.

The Fields was presented by the International Congress of Mathematicians to this year’s four winners in a ceremony in Seoul on Wednesday.

Mirzakhani’s research focuses on “understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects,” according to a Stanford release. A text provided by the ICM further explains that she works on so-called Riemann surfaces and their deformations. The ICM praised her for “strong geometric intuition.”

A Huge First For Women: Female Mathematician Wins Fields Medal

heroine 

-naomi